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The DRC National Strategic Plan 2014-2020 outlines a multi-sectoral vision that aims to increase the modern contraceptive prevalence to 19% and provide access to and use of modern contraceptive methods to at least 2.1 million women by 2020.

Emphasizing its role in reducing maternal mortality, in 2014 the government of the DRC officially approved the National Strategic Plan for Family Planning 2014–2020. DRC-IHP is working in more than 2100 health centers and community care sites throughout 78 health zones to train health workers at all levels in contraceptive technology and family planning counseling.

The Leadership Development Program Plus (LDP+) is the enhanced version of the Leadership Development Program (LDP) first delivered by Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime) in 2002.

To improve quality of service provision and data accuracy and timeliness, USAID Mikolo is introducing mobile technology to replace paper-based tools used by community health volunteers (CHVs).Working alongside the Ministry of Public Health and other partners, the project has developed a smartphone application that CHVs will use to manage their health services and record-keeping and disseminate inf

In Madagascar, despite years of efforts to improve maternal health, the maternal mortality ratio remains as high at 487 deaths per 100,000 live births, whereas the average for developing countries is 235. Additionally, only 51% of pregnant women receive four antental care (ANC) visits, which is the recommended number to prevent and manage possible pregnancy complications.

The USAID Mikolo Project created a new approach to assure, improve, and sustain the quality of community-based health services.This technical brief describes the Mikolo approach and assesses its impact on community health volunteer performance between 2014 and 2016. The USAID Mikolo Project quality assurance / quality improvement approach included ve key activities:

The USAID Mikolo Project, in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Health and the Ministry of Youth and Sports, established aYouth Peer Educators (YPE) initiative.The initiative aims to improve youth education and awareness on reproductive health and FP in order to increase contraceptive prevalence rates among 15–24 year olds in USAID Mikolo intervention areas.

Technical Highlight Malaria is responsible for about 7% of all deaths in children under five in Madagascar. The USAID Mikolo Project promoted community approaches to prevent and treat malaria by working with health facilities, community health volunteers (CHVs), and families.

We are pleased to share this booklet that summarizes 10 of the best stories we’ve collected from the field. These narratives are a legacy to Madagascar’s health system and for future public health interventions in the country.

Community health volunteers (CHVs) in Madagascar serve as first-line health care providers for many communities located more than five kilometers from a basic health center (CSB). They provide routine services for family planning and maternal, newborn, and child health, and refer patients for appropriate higher-level services.

A Toolkit for Using Evidence from the State of the World’s Midwifery 2014 Report to Create Policy Change at the Country Level

Infectious disease outbreaks devastate communities and cost the world $60 billion a year in response efforts—matching the toll of wars and natural disasters in terms of economic impact and lives lost. Local preparedness is the key to stopping outbreaks at the source.

Funded by the U.S.

To upgrade from an older version of QuanTB download and read these instructions. QuanTB 4.1 QuanTB E-Course An e-course for health professionals on how to use QuanTB, a downloadable forecasting, quantification and early warning tool for TB medicines. Version 4.1 available as of August 24, 2017.

Unique identification is essential to progress toward meeting PEPFAR’s 95-95-95 goal. For people living with HIV, better program management means more timely testing and promotes continuity of service for lifesaving sustained ART. Providers can assess treatment regimens and their effectiveness toward achieving viral suppression.

In the last decade, many strategies have called for integration of HIV and child survival platforms to reduce missed opportunities and improve child health outcomes. Countries with generalized HIV epidemics have been encouraged to optimize each clinical encounter to bend the HIV epidemic curve. This systematic review looks at integrated child health services and summarizes evidence on their health outcomes, service uptake, acceptability, and identified enablers and barriers. Interventions of interest were HIV services integrated with: neonatal/child services for children <5 years, hospital care of children <5 years, immunizations, and nutrition services. Outcomes of interest were: health outcomes of children <5 years, integrated services uptake, acceptability, and enablers and barriers. Twenty-eight articles were reviewed. Service integration had positive effects on child health outcomes, HIV testing, and postnatal service uptake. Integrated services were generally acceptable, although confidentiality and stigma were concerns. Each clinical “touch point” with infants and children is an opportunity to provide comprehensive health services. In the current era of flat funding levels, integration of HIV and child health services is an effective, acceptable way to achieve positive child health outcomes.

In 2011, the Malawi Ministry of Health introduced option B+, a universal treatment strategy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV. Under option B+, all pregnant or breastfeeding women with HIV are eligible for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) regardless of clinical stage or CD4. Routine data from Malawi's prevention of MTCT option B+ programme suggest high uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among pregnant women. Malawi's Ministry of Health led the National Evaluation of Malawi's PMTCT Program to obtain nationally representative data on maternal ART coverage and prevention of MTCT effectiveness. Here we present the early transmission data for infants aged 4–12 weeks and used a multistage cluster design to recruit a nationally representative sample of HIV-exposed infants and their mothers. Between October 16, 2014 and May 17, 2016, we screened for HIV in all mothers attending an under-5 vaccination or outpatient sick-child clinic with infants aged 4–26 weeks. They confirmed HIV exposure in 3542 (10·4%) of 33 980 mother (guardian)–infant pairs with infants aged 4–26 weeks. These data suggest that Malawi's decentralization of ART services has resulted in higher ART coverage and lower early MTCT. However, the uptake of services for HIV-exposed infants remains suboptimal.

Community health worker (CHW) interventions to manage childhood illness is a strategy promoted by the global health community, which involves training and supporting CHW to assess, classify, and treat sick children at home. To inform CHW policy, the Government of Tanzania launched a program in 2011 to determine if community case management (CCM) of malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea could be implemented by CHW in that country. This paper reports the results of an observational study on the CCM service delivery quality of a trial cohort of CHW in Tanzania, called WAJA. In the majority of cases, WAJA correctly assess sick children for CCM-treatable illnesses (malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea) and general danger signs (90% and 89%, respectively), but too few correctly assess for physical danger signs (39%). In majority of cases (78%) WAJA treated children correctly (84% of malaria, 74% pneumonia, and 71% diarrhea cases). Errors were often associated with lapses in health systems support, mainly supervision and logistics. For CCM to be effective, in Tanzania, a strategy to implement it must be coordinated with efforts to strengthen local health systems.

Funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime), the goal of the five-year MTaPS program (2018–2023) is to help low and middle-income countries strengthen their pharmaceutical systems to ensure sustainable access to and appropriate use of safe, effective, quality-assured, and affordable essential medicines and pharmaceutical servi

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