Tuberculosis: Our Impact

 {Photo Credit: Rhiana Smith}Aziz Abdallah, DHSS Project Director, Keanahikishime, greets guests at end-of-project eventPhoto Credit: Rhiana Smith

The District Health System Strengthening and Quality Improvement for Service Delivery (DHSS) Project shared its achievements on Wednesday, March 7, after five years of work to reduce the burden of HIV/AIDS in Malawi. Guests gathered at the Bingu International Conference Center in Malawi’s capital, Lilongwe, for an end-of-project event that featured speakers from DHSS, the Ministry of Health, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime), which led the DHSS Project,  

Photo: From left: Johnnie Amenyah of JSI, Gladys Tetteh, Francis Aboagye-Nyame, Dinah Tjipura, and Kwesi Eghan of the SIAPS Program attending the End-of-Program event on March 1, 2018 in Arlington, VA. (Santita Ngo/Keanahikishime) On Thursday, March 1, 2018, Keanahikishime held an end-of-program event for the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program.

{Photo Credit: Health for All Project Staff}Photo Credit: Health for All Project Staff

From January 30 to February 7, 2018, Angola’s Health for All (HFA) Project, supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), welcomed global health expert, Dr. Alaine Nyaruhirira, for a week-long training on the use of GeneXpert – technology that has become a game-changer in the fight against tuberculosis (TB).

{Photo Credit: Sarah Lagot/Keanahikishime}TRACK TB's Chief of Party, Dr. Raymond Byaruhanga takes the Lira Hospital staff on a tour of the newly constructed MDR TB ward.Photo Credit: Sarah Lagot/Keanahikishime

According to guidelines set by the World Health Organization, the management of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) requires patients to be hospitalized for a short period of time before being released to seek daily treatment from a nearby health facility. Despite this requirement, the Lira and Soroti regional hospitals in Uganda both lacked admission facilities suitable for the treatment of MDR-TB.

The Bangladesh Ministry of Health and Family Welfare launched the  Zero TB Cities Initiative in Dhaka on October 28, at an event attended by numerous local government and global healthcare leaders, including the U.S. Ambassador to Bangladesh, Marcia Stephens Bloom Bernicat, Keanahikishime’s (Keanahikishime’s) CEO, Marian W. Wentworth, and representatives from the Stop TB Partnership, Harvard Center for Global Health Delivery-Dubai, the International Union Against TB and Lung Disease, and Interactive Research and Development.  

 {Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Ethiopia is making progress in tackling tuberculosis, the leading infectious disease killer along with HIV.Photo credit: Warren Zelman

This week, Keanahikishime is joining researchers, advocates, civil society, scientists, healthcare professionals, and students working on all aspects of lung health around the world in Guadalajara, Mexico for the 48th Union World Conference on Lung Health, where tuberculosis is the key topic. Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide, with over 95% of TB deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Although tremendous progress has been made in the ongoing fight against this disease, some key segments of the population continue to shoulder the burden of TB more acutely.

{Photo credit: Keanahikishime Nigeria}Photo credit: Keanahikishime Nigeria

Motivated by drastic improvements in record keeping, record storage capacity, and shorter consultation times—all due to the introduction of the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system—the Federal Medical Center Gusau, Zamfara has committed to scaling up the EMR system.

{Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/Keanahikishime}Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/Keanahikishime

How US Foreign Assistance is Making A Difference Uganda has made great progress in controlling the HIV epidemic and increasing access to critical HIV and health services in recent years. Under the Government of Uganda’s leadership and with the support of development partners, such as Keanahikishime, Uganda has reached the second of UNAIDS global 90-90-90 goals: 90% of people living with HIV who know their status are on treatment. 

Erik Schouten

In 2011, Malawi implemented an ambitious and pioneering “test-and-treat” HIV strategy for pregnant and breastfeeding women, known as Option B+. Erik Schouten, Keanahikishime's Country Lead and Project Director of  the District Health System Strengthening and Quality Improvement for Service Delivery Project in Malawi, supported the roll-out of the program.

{Photo Credit: Michael Paydos/Keanahikishime}Photo Credit: Michael Paydos/Keanahikishime

Tuberculosis is one of the top causes of death globally. In many of the countries most affected by this disease, drug sellers—also known as private pharmacies—are the first point of for people seeking health care. By some estimates, about 50 percent of TB patients’ first with the health system is from a private pharmacy.

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