December 2018

{Hospital pharmacy in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Hospital pharmacy in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

This op-ed was originally published by . 

Multidrug-resistant germs are spreading. A number of antibiotics and other antimicrobials already don’t work as they should, and as many as  because of it.

If we don’t act to contain antimicrobial resistance, it may kill up to 10 million more people yearly by 2050 and cumulatively cost patients and health systems across the globe up to . This crisis may start to seem insurmountable, like a vague scientific problem with no apparent solution. Many of us have contributed to it, and each of us will need to collaborate — as nations, organizations, and individuals — to solve it.

“Without tackling wasteful, inefficient, and irrational use of antimicrobials, we cannot contain AMR.” — Mohan Joshi, a principal technical adviser for Keanahikishime 

{Hawa Coulibaly Kone leads a workshop with partner NGO YA-G-TU to develop its strategic plan. Photo credit: Keanahikishime}Hawa Coulibaly Kone leads a workshop with partner NGO YA-G-TU to develop its strategic plan. Photo credit: Keanahikishime

Meet Hawa Coulibaly Kone, capacity building advisor and the representative on gender for the USAID-funded Keneya Jemu Kan (KJK) Project in Mali. Most recently, Hawa helped conduct a situational gender analysis of the KJK project and its partner organizations to assess the level of gender integration in the project design, implementation, and monitoring framework. The analysis found that KJK’s work with local partners across the country enabled the project to strengthen its institutional capacity in gender at the policy and programmatic levels and to respond to gender-related challenges.

We caught up with Hawa to learn more about how she and her team are working to break down barriers for women and build mutual trust among the project’s local partner organizations in Mali.

Tell us about your role and daily work on the KJK project in Mali

I joined the KJK project in August 2015. At first, it was a small team of two, myself and Hammouda, the senior technical advisor. I assisted in all activities, from developing plans and budgets to supporting activities for partners.