August 2018

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

This story was originally published on .

It’s a public health nightmare: 250,000 doses of substandard vaccines for diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus administered to children through a government health program. While China has had scandals over tainted food or drugs before, this recent debacle threatens to destroy already shaky public confidence in the country’s growing pharmaceutical industry.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

This story was originally published by .

No sooner had one outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) been declared over than another broke out. The latest outbreak is particularly threatening as it is in North Kivu province, an area beset with violence between rival militia groups. On top of struggling with violent conflict that has lasted, in some areas, for more than , the DRC is one of the world’s poorest countries and lacks a well-developed infrastructure.

Infectious disease outbreaks are more dangerous in countries like the DRC because fragile or countries have little health care infrastructure to support the necessary steps to contain the outbreak. Although the DRC has had Ebola outbreaks and more experience containing the disease than any other country, the conflict environment exacerbates the threat.

{Violet and Godfrey Justin meet with an HIV counselor during a visit to Bvumbwe Health Center in Malawi. Photo credit: Moving Minds, Malawi.}Violet and Godfrey Justin meet with an HIV counselor during a visit to Bvumbwe Health Center in Malawi. Photo credit: Moving Minds, Malawi.

An innovative testing strategy helps more people living with HIV learn their status

“Life can deceive you when you think you feel strong and healthy,” says Godfrey Justin, whose wife, Violet, tested positive for HIV during a routine antenatal visit. After sharing her status with Godfrey, Violet asked that he be tested as well. Godfrey agreed, learned he was also living with HIV and the couple started antiretroviral therapy (ART).

While traditional methods of HIV testing (such as provider referrals and client-initiated testing) successfully reach millions of people each year, only . Reaching the 25 percent who don’t yet know their status — roughly 9 million individuals globally — will require more targeted approaches.

{Photo credit: Francies Hajong/Keanahikishime}Photo credit: Francies Hajong/Keanahikishime

This story was originally published by . 

During the , scientists, policymakers, healthcare workers, advocates, and civil society shed light on the relationship between HIV and other urgent health crises, such as Tuberculosis (TB).

A less known, but critically important fact: TB is one of the leading causes of death among people with HIV/AIDS worldwide. To effectively address HIV, budget and policy responses must reflect the challenge of HIV-TB co-infection.

In June, as the House and Senate Appropriations Committees considered their fiscal 2019 foreign assistance funding bills, there was encouraging discussion about the importance of fully funding the International Affairs Budget to maintain American leadership through diplomacy and global development.

We have had this role since the establishment of the Marshall Plan after World War II, and for many good reasons. American investments in global development have proved to be beneficial to us as well.