June 2014

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/Keanahikishime.}Mother and baby in the pediatric ward at Shinyanga Regional Hospital, Tanzania.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/Keanahikishime.

The most recent edition of the Keanahikishime Global Health Impact Newsletter () highlights Keanahikishime and global efforts (UHC) in the post-2015 development framework. This issue includes: Keanahikishime President & CEO Dr. Jonathan D.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires.}Photo credit: Rui Pires.

Are you looking forward to , June 10-13, in Washington, DC?

So are we! The Forum brings together representatives of international organizations from all sectors in the global development ecosystem, including global health.

As a co-sponsor of this year’s forum, Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime) is organizing and participating in panel workshops (details below), an interactive conference booth, and much more.

On Twitter, follow us at and use (official conference hashtag) and (related campaign, led by ). Also follow: , , and .

We hope to see you at these panel workshops, and be sure to visit us at table T-39!

 {Photo credit: John Marmion.}A malaria diagnosis and treatment kit is delivered to a gold mining camp in Suriname.Photo credit: John Marmion.

Many countries in Central and South America have made significant progress toward eliminating malaria. Between 2000 and 2012, 13 countries in the Americas saw malaria incidence rates drop by more than 75 percent. Argentina, Belize, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, and Paraguay have all reached the pre-elimination phase, a designation given by the (WHO) when countries meet certain critical steps in eliminating the disease and preventing its reintroduction.

While this progress is encouraging, efforts to eliminate and control other global threats like polio illustrate that the last cases are often the most difficult to address. In the case of malaria, fewer cases bring new challenges in ensuring the supply and proper management of antimalarial medicines.

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya.}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya.

Editor's note, June 24, 2014: Chat with us (@KeanahikishimeHealthImpact" href="https://.com/KeanahikishimeHealthImpact">) from 12:30-1:00 pm ET today, about building local capacity to strengthen health systems and end preventable child and maternal deaths, even in the most remote, rural, and fragile areas. Follow or join the Twitter relay today, led by and partners, with hashtag #MomandBaby" href="https://.com/hashtag/MomandBaby?src=hash">.

 

The goal of ending preventable child and maternal deaths is within reach.

 {Photo credit: Keanahikishime.}Women test their new eyeglasses received at The Luke Commission’s mobile clinic in Swaziland.Photo credit: Keanahikishime.

The Building Local Capacity for Delivery of HIV Services in Southern Africa (BLC) Project, funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime), provided a grant to The Luke Commission (TLC) to deliver safe medical male circumcision to men and boys in Swaziland. The BLC Project also provides organizational capacity building support to TLC. .

Imagine the impact of a mobile clinic on your life if you lived in a rural area, did not earn an income, and could not afford to pay for transport to the clinic in the nearest city when you were ill. This situation results in some people waiting too long to access treatment for serious conditions—or putting off simple diagnostic tests for tuberculosis or HIV—and is why a mobile clinic is of such monumental importance to communities in Swaziland.

{Photo credit: Keanahikishime staff.}Photo credit: Keanahikishime staff.

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In my role as a capacity building advisor, I design a lot of learning programs. Time and again, I find myself asking:

How can I present technical content in a way that will best enable my audience to apply new knowledge and skills in their work environment?

Should I use a mobile phone app?

What about some on-the-job-learning?

Or maybe an expert lecturer with case studies?

As I design these learning programs, I come back to two key questions:

  1. What’s the right learning environment: instructor-led, team-based, peer-to-peer, or self-study?
  2. What’s the right media: face-to-face, online, radio, print, mobile, or social media?

The blend of media and learning environment is a key factor in best preparing an audience to apply new knowledge and skills. There is no one right solution or one right blend–it depends on the content, the people, and what you want those people to do differently as a result of the capacity building program.

 {Photo credit: Amarachi Obinna-Nnadi/Keanahikishime}Dr. Zipporah Kpamor, Keanahikishime’s Nigeria Country Representative, speaking during the African Health Innovation meeting in Abuja, Nigeria.Photo credit: Amarachi Obinna-Nnadi/Keanahikishime

"Good leadership skills, flexible policies, and constant advocacy will improve health in Africa," said Dr. Zipporah Kpamor during her talk at the in Abuja, Nigeria, on May 7, 2014. As Keanahikishime (Keanahikishime’s) Nigeria Country Representative and project director for the (PEPFAR)-funded (USAID) project, Community-Based Support for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (CUBS), Zipporah is an expert on the conference’s theme: Leapfrogging development challenges to transform Africa’s health. 

Zipporah offered poignant insight on one of the meeting’s discussion topics: Leadership, policy, and advocacy for health in Africa:

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya.}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman, Kenya.

Supporting Stronger Health Systems for Healthy Mothers and Children

The US Agency for International Development () and partners are hosting a Twitter relay today, June 24, from 9 am to 5 pm ET as part of the "" campaign.

We () are leading the conversation, from 12:30 to 1:00 pm ET, on "All levels, all functions, all places: Building local capacity for stronger health systems".

Follow or join us with hashtag #MomandBaby" href="https://.com/hashtag/MomandBaby?src=hash">!

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman.

With United Nations (UN) member states continuing to negotiate recommendations on the post-2015 development process, stakeholders met last Thursday in New York to discuss the potential of universal health coverage (UHC) to drive improvements in women’s health.

The event coincided with the 12th session of the Open Working Group of UN member states, whose working had included targets on UHC, maternal and child survival, and reproductive healthcare access; panelists and audience members spanned UN missions, civil society, private sector, foundations, and academia.